In a recent interview with DiabeticCouncil.com, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, was presented with two questions regarding foot care for newly diagnosed diabetics.

The full article, which features responses from 47 podiatrists around the United States, can be found here, but if you are looking for just Dr. Goldbaum’s responses, they can be be found below.

Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.
Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.

Q: What tips would you give to someone who is newly diagnosed?

A: The first thing a patient needs to do is realize that everything is going to change in terms of how they take care of their feet. What used to be labeled as a harmless cut or blister now can become something far worse if left untreated. The first thing a newly diagnosed diabetic needs to learn is to work a foot check — the bottom, the top and even in between toes — into their daily routine. A podiatrist should also be called upon to keep tabs on the health of their feet, especially if there are any signs of infection or abnormalities. Given how diabetes negatively affects circulation, even a small scape on the bottom of the foot has the potential to turn into a serious ulcer, as your body’s ability to get a proper amount of blood flow heading to your lower extremities becomes more and more limited. For this reason, increased attention to the state of your feet is one of the key changes all diabetics need to make in order to remain healthy.

Q: Why do you think a lot of people ignore their foot care when it comes to diabetes?

A: A lot of the time ignorance isn’t intentional, but rather due to a lack of an education regarding diabetic foot care. When a patient is diagnosed with diabetes, typically the first thing they think of is their diet and what’s going into their body rather than how the disease is going to affect what’s already there. I’m sure if everyone were shown pictures of the effects of diabetic neuropathy, especially what an untreated ulcer looks like, they would be more aware of the attention that needs to be paid to their feet. When looking at the big picture, diabetes needs to taught as an all-encompassing condition, rather than focusing on specific area. The best thing a patient can do is be pro-active in their treatment rather than re-active, and that’s how we approach things at our offices.

If you are interested in conducting your own interview with Dr. Goldbaum, who has offices in Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and Delray Beach, about diabetes or the podiatric field in general, please see our contact information below.

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The content on this website is for informational purposes only. Do not rely or act upon information from www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com without seeking professional medical advice. If you live in South Florida and would like a consultation with Dr. Ian Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, please see our contact information below:

BOCA/DELRAY

16244 S. Military Trail #290, Delray Beach, FL 33484

561-499-0033

BOYNTON BEACH

8198 Jog Road #100, Boynton Beach, FL 33472

561-499-0033

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