Medically known as bromodosis, smelly feet are a common year-round problem, especially for those living in the torrid climate of South Florida.

Why do feet smell?
Why do feet smell?

This unpleasant foot odor occurs when sweat mixes with bacteria that live on your skin and in your shoes, producing an acid byproduct that can leave you holding your nose in disgust.

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to completely stop your feet from sweating, regardless of the temperature or time of year. There are roughly 250,000 sweat glands in your feet — the largest concentration of sweat glands in the entire body — that produce around a pint of moisture every day. And unlike sweat glands elsewhere in the body, the sweat glands in your feet secrete all the time, not just in response to heat or exercise.

The main causes of foot odor are:

Poor personal hygiene: By not washing your body regularly, you fail to slow down the buildup of odor-causing bacteria.

Hormones: You excrete more sweat during hormonal changes, meaning teenagers going through puberty and pregnant women are at a higher risk for foot odor.

Fungal Infections: Any sort of fungal infection on your feet, such as athlete’s foot, can create foot odor.

Hyperhidrosis: A medical condition that causes your body to sweat more than usual.

Stress: Anxiety and stress trigger the release of a stress hormone called “cortisol,” which in turn stimulates the sweat glands.

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Calluses can develop on hands, feet, or anywhere there is repeated friction. The common callus usually occurs when there’s been a lot of rubbing against the hands or feet.

Foot calluses typically have a yellowed or grayish coloration and can be unsightly and painful. A plantar callus is found on the bottom of the foot.

How to get rid of calluses (www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com)
How to get rid of calluses (www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com)

The feet typically develop calluses from an improper walking motion or ill-fitting shoes that create unwanted friction as you move. High-heeled shoes, which put added pressure on toes, are one of the worst offenders and the main reason why women are four times more likely to have foot problems than men.

Luckily, calluses are not permanent. By following some of the treatment steps below, you should be callus-free in no time!

Find the Source

When dealing with calluses, it’s important to first find the source of your problem. If this pesky source of friction and aggravation isn’t alleviated, your corns and calluses will not heal, and removal will be followed by recurrence. The best place to start when searching for the source would be your shoes as ill-fitting shoes often do not have enough toe space and constrict the toes together. In some cases, a podiatrist may be called upon to craft a custom-made orthotic in order to get the right fit for those who suffer from chronic calluses.

Soak and Scrub

Soak your feet in warm, soapy water for about 10 minutes. As you do this, your skin should start to soften. You may add Epsom salts or other ingredients to your soak, but they’re not necessary. With a back-and-forth motion and moderate pressure, rub a wet pumice stone over the growths, sanding the corns and calluses down, intermittently rinsing to remove pumice stone particles. Do not overly scrub your feet and stop immediately if you begin to feel pain.

Don’t Forget to Dry

After a good soak and scrub, make sure to dry your affected area completely if you’re interested in getting rid of calluses on feet permanently. It is important that you don’t allow it to remain damp. You should always use towel to remove the moisture. You can also apply a topical antibiotic to the area where the callus was and to surrounding skin in order to lower the risk of infection. If you got too close to the skin, use a bandage to protect the wound.

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The sesamoid bones are two small bones which are embedded in the tendon of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle just under the base of the big toe.

The purpose of the sesamoid bones is to protect the tendon of the flexor hallucis longus muscle and increase the strength of the muscle by giving it a mechanical advantage by acting as a level and take on most of the weight bearing on the inside of the foot.

www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com
www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com

Sesamoids provide a smooth surface over which the tendons slide, thus increasing the ability of the tendons to transmit muscle forces. The sesamoids in the forefoot also assist with weight bearing and help elevate the bones of the big toe.

Unfortunately, like all other bones, sesamoids can break. Additionally, the tendons surrounding the sesamoids can become irritated or inflamed, resulting in a condition known as sesamoiditis.

Causes

Sesamoiditis is commonly caused by performing similar actions that involve the toe over and over again.

Activities commonly associated with sesamoitis include:

  • Running
  • Dancing
  • Most sports

Symptoms

The symptoms of sesamoiditis can range from a dull ache to a sharp pain every time you walk. Additionally, bending the big toe upwards will generally cause the pain to worsen.

Other symptoms include:

  • Pain is focused under the great toe on the ball of the foot.
  • Pain often develops gradually
  • Swelling and bruising
  • The affected area may be swollen and slightly red.

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About 20 percent of the population suffers from brittle nail syndrome, a condition that causes toenails to become extremely brittle and ultimately break.

Your toenails are made up of layers of protein that are responsible for making the nail strong and thick. In people suffering from brittle nail syndrome, these protein layers separate or break down.

Get help for brittle toenails at Delray Beach Podiatry. [Image via MorgueFile.com]
Get help for brittle toenails at Delray Beach Podiatry. [Image via MorgueFile.com]
It’s important to remember that like our skin, nails can also dry out, which causes them to break and become more vulnerable to toenail infections. This condition most often occurs with repeated exposure to moisture and can be exacerbated by low atmospheric humidity. This is because your nails expand when they come into contact with water, and then contract when they dry out. Unfortunately, this constant back and forth between expansion and contract eventually takes a toll on your nails and makes them brittle.

Medically known as onychorrhexis, brittle toenails are visually unappealing as it causes the nails become rigid and split.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Nails that break or peel easily
  • Flaking at the base of the nail
  • Your nails have a series of longitudinal ridges
  • The protein layers of your nails break down or separate

There is often not one single cause for brittle toenail syndrome, but rather a number of factors working together.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has found that there are several possible causes of of brittle toenail syndrome that include, but are not limited to the following:

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Circulator Boot Therapy is a revolutionary treatment option for both diabetics and non-diabetics that can prevent amputations of the lower extremities, even in advanced cases where surgery has already been scheduled.

Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.
Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.

As well as providing an immediate boost to arterial and venous circulation, the procedure can also slowly break down clots. It increases the breakdown of plaque within the arteries by the release of nitric oxide oxygen and nourishment increase. You will see swelling and pain subside with the first few sessions. As circulation is restored with each further session, the body can begin to heal itself.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has used Circulator Boot Therapy to save a staggering 38 limbs from being amputated.

“It saves people’s lives,” said Dr. Goldbaum, who is the only doctor in South Florida with access to a Circular Boot. “When you have an amputation, within five years there is usually another event that transpires and people can pass away because of it.”

Circulation Boot Therapy is an excellent method for treating and correcting circulation problems such as diabetic ulcers and venous insufficiency.

“This is one of the few things we have that’s external and it does a terrific job,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This actually saves people’s limbs from being taken off.”

Many amputations begin with a small injury to the foot, leg or toe, especially in the case of diabetics. Proper treatment, such as Circulator Boot Therapy, can prevent what may ultimately lead to infections and gangrene and end with an amputation and often a myriad of life long medical complications.

“Every time I have used Circulator Boot Therapy, it has increased blood flow,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “It’s all about blood flow. If you have good blood flow, then you have oxygen and nutrients that the body needs to heal.”

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