Circulator Boot Therapy is a revolutionary treatment option for both diabetics and non-diabetics that can prevent amputations of the lower extremities, even in advanced cases where surgery has already been scheduled.

Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.
Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.

As well as providing an immediate boost to arterial and venous circulation, the procedure can also slowly break down clots. It increases the breakdown of plaque within the arteries by the release of nitric oxide oxygen and nourishment increase. You will see swelling and pain subside with the first few sessions. As circulation is restored with each further session, the body can begin to heal itself.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has used Circulator Boot Therapy to save a staggering 38 limbs from being amputated.

“It saves people’s lives,” said Dr. Goldbaum, who is the only doctor in South Florida with access to a Circular Boot. “When you have an amputation, within five years there is usually another event that transpires and people can pass away because of it.”

Circulation Boot Therapy is an excellent method for treating and correcting circulation problems such as diabetic ulcers and venous insufficiency.

“This is one of the few things we have that’s external and it does a terrific job,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This actually saves people’s limbs from being taken off.”

Many amputations begin with a small injury to the foot, leg or toe, especially in the case of diabetics. Proper treatment, such as Circulator Boot Therapy, can prevent what may ultimately lead to infections and gangrene and end with an amputation and often a myriad of life long medical complications.

“Every time I have used Circulator Boot Therapy, it has increased blood flow,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “It’s all about blood flow. If you have good blood flow, then you have oxygen and nutrients that the body needs to heal.”

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What is Radiofrequency Closure?

If you are someone currently suffering from a vascular disorder, there is a good chance that you’ve heard of this procedure at least once.

It sounds like something out of the future, but I assure you that this technology is both practical and effective for treating conditions such as venous insufficiency or varicose veins.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, specializes in treating a wide variety of vascular disorders by utilizing this advanced ultrasound technology.

Dr. Goldbaum performing Radiofrequency Closure on a patient suffering from venous insufficiency.
Dr. Goldbaum performing Radiofrequency Closure on a patient suffering from venous insufficiency.

“We use Radiofrequency Closure,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “We close down the faulty vein, allowing the oxygen to get to the muscles and the nerves. This keeps the de-oxygenated blood from pooling as it does with venous insufficiency.”

The closure procedure is performed in the office and takes roughly 30 minutes to perform. Using ultrasound guidance, a thin catheter is inserted into the diseased vein and delivers radiofrequency energy to the vein wall.

“We do an ultrasound of the lower extremity and actually measure the diameter of the vein,” said Dr. Goldbuam. “We can then measure the distance between Point A and Point B and measure the speed of the blood flow. If it doesn’t make the proper numbers, then we can conclude that the patient has venous insufficiency.”

As the radiofrequency energy is delivered and the catheter is withdrawn, the vein wall is heated, causing the collagen in the wall to shrink and the vein to close.

Once the diseased vein is closed, blood is re-routed to healthy veins and circulation will begin to improve. For an easier understanding, Dr. Goldbaum likens the procedure to fixing a traffic jam – when one road is blocked, cars simply take a detour to get to their destination.

The procedure is performed using local anesthesia and there is virtually no post-operative discomfort.

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