If you have pain or discomfort in your feet or ankle joints, you might have flat feet.

Do you have flat feet? Keep reading to find out!
Do you have flat feet? Keep reading to find out!

The arch, or instep, is the middle part of the foot that’s usually raised off the ground when you stand, while the rest of the foot remains flat on the ground. If you have flat feet, however, a fallen arch causes your foot to roll inwards and your entire sole comes close to touching the ground.

A flat foot, also known as pes planus, is normal in infants and toddlers, because the foot’s arch hasn’t yet developed. These arches typically develop throughout childhood, but some people never develop arches, which can lead to flat foot disorder.

Arches can also fall over time due to overall wear and tear that weakens the tendon that runs along the inside of your ankle and helps support your arch.

With a fallen arch, your tendons and ligaments weaken and cause intense pain throughout your feet, ankles, and lower leg muscles, especially in the region of your arch and heel.

“If you are suffering from flat feet, it means that you have a biomechanical fault in the mid-tarsal region,” said Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum of Delray Beach Podiatry. “When this happens, the arch is not actually present and, upon ambulation, the arch will flatten out. This creates a lot of soft tissue problems and joint problems later on in life.”

Flat feet can also contribute to problems in your ankles and knees because the condition can alter the alignment of your legs. If you aren’t having pain, no treatment is usually necessary for flatfeet. Additionally, if left untreated, the condition can also lead to weakened posture and discomfort through your hips and lower back.

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If you have pain or discomfort in your feet or ankle joints, you might have flat feet.

The arch, or instep, is the middle part of the foot that’s usually raised off the ground when you stand, while the rest of the foot remains flat on the ground. If you have flat feet, however, a fallen arch causes your foot to roll inwards and your entire sole comes close to touching the ground.

The Facts About Flat Feet
The Facts About Flat Feet

A flat foot is normal in infants and toddlers, because the foot’s arch hasn’t yet developed. These arches typically develop throughout childhood, but some people never develop arches, which can lead to flat foot disorder.

Arches can also fall over time due to overall wear and tear that weakens the tendon that runs along the inside of your ankle and helps support your arch.

With a fallen arch, your tendons and ligaments weaken and cause intense pain throughout your feet, ankles, and lower leg muscles, especially in the region of your arch and heel.

Flat feet can also contribute to problems in your ankles and knees because the condition can alter the alignment of your legs. If you aren’t having pain, no treatment is usually necessary for flatfeet. Additionally, if left untreated, the condition can also lead to weakened posture and discomfort through your hips and lower back.

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Although he is reportedly unlikely to miss his next start against the Boston Red Sox on Sunday, Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Taijuan Walker’s recent announcement that he suffers from flat feet did catch the attention of baseball fans around the league.

Flat-Feet-Walker
Podiatry in Sports: Taijuan Walker

Walker, who owns a 3-6 record in 13 starts this season, is currently dealing with tendinitis and inflammation in the posterior tibial tendon, which runs near the Achilles and controls support to the arch in the foot.

Head athletic trainer Rick Griffin, however, noted that this problem actually stems from Walker having extremely flat feet.

“It’s way better today,” Walker told the Seattle Times of his condition on Wednesday. “I’ve had it before. I just stay on it (treatment) and make sure I tape it all up, make sure everything is good and secure.”

The question now is: What does having flat feet mean for Walker’s future?

A flat foot, also known as pes planus, is normal in infants and toddlers, because the foot’s arch hasn’t yet developed. These arches typically develop throughout childhood, but some people never develop arches, which can lead to flat foot disorder.

The arch, or instep, is the middle part of the foot that’s usually raised off the ground when you stand, while the rest of the foot remains flat on the ground. If you have flat feet, however, a fallen arch causes your foot to roll inwards and your entire sole comes close to touching the ground.

Arches can also fall over time due to overall wear and tear that weakens the tendon that runs along the inside of your ankle and helps support your arch.

With a fallen arch, your tendons and ligaments weaken and cause intense pain throughout your feet, ankles, and lower leg muscles, especially in the region of your arch and heel.

“If you are suffering from flat feet, as Taijuan Walker does, it means that you have a biomechanical fault in the mid-tarsal region,” said Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum of Delray Beach Podiatry. “When this happens, the arch is not actually present and, upon ambulation, the arch will flatten out. This creates a lot of soft tissue problems and joint problems later on in life.”

Flat feet can also contribute to problems in your ankles and knees because the condition can alter the alignment of your legs. If you aren’t having pain, no treatment is usually necessary for flatfeet. Additionally, if left untreated, the condition can also lead to weakened posture and discomfort through your hips and lower back.

In Walker’s case, Dr. Goldbaum notes that the best treatment possible would be having arch-support orthotics specially crafted to fit the ailing pitchers feet.

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Overview of Flatfoot

Flatfoot is a common condition that affects the shape and formation of the foot. Medically speaking, flatfoot is sometimes referred to as a pronated foot. When an individual suffers from this condition, the foot arch disappears as they stand. Furthermore, the foot is positioned completely flat on the ground.

There are three known forms of flatfoot that doctors are aware of. And they are flexible flatfoot, flexible flatfoot with a short Achilles tendon, and rigid flatfoot. Individuals who suffer from a flexible flatfoot suffer from a condition that affects both of the feet. This condition does not induce pain, nor does it cause any physical disability. Conversely, flexible flatfoot with a short Achilles tendon causes both pain and disability in some cases. Rigid flatfoot is only seen infrequently, but it emerges in those who have an issue with the bone formation in their feet. One in four individuals with flatfoot suffer from some degree of pain and disability.

80% to 90% of all North American babies have flatfoot. Most of these babies have flexible flatfoot in particular. Generally, children simply outgrow this condition. But alarmingly, 20% of all adults in North America retain the flatfoot condition throughout their lives. 25% of those afflicted with flatfoot have flatfoot with a short Achilles tendon, and 9% have the condition known as rigid flatfoot.

Symptoms of Flatfoot

Children with flexible flatfoot usually require no medical treatment. However rigid flatfoot causes many medical issues. Typically, when the children with this condition experience pain, it is localized in a single region of the foot, not throughout the foot.

Diagnosis

During the diagnostic process, the medical professional will observe the child’s foot and ankle. The doctor will examine the child’s foot and ankle as they are standing. The child may be instructed to either dangle the foot, or to stand on their tiptoes. During the diagnostic assessment, the child’s foot and ankle joints will be examined, as well. If the child shows decreased movement in the ankle, they may have a short Achilles tendon. Sometimes, a radiograph is required to retrieve more information about the child’s foot.

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Flat feet are a painful condition in which the arch of your foot has collapsed. Here are a few ways to avoid or help you out with flat feet.

How to Avoid Flat Feet

  1. Wear good shoes. This is the most important way to make sure you don’t get flat feet. You need to make sure that your shoes fit and are comfortable. You also need to check that there is arch support in your shoes that start at the side and fade into the center.
  2. Tie shoes tightly. If you don’t, the arch supports in you shoes lose their value leading to blisters and messing up your toes.
  3. Try out this exercise:
Tie a small rubber band around your big toes. Place a tin can between your feet, in your arches, and try to touch your heels together. Sounds silly, but do you really want to end up with flat feet?
  4. Add more support. If you absolutely have to have shoes that lack arch support, do yourself a huge favor and buy inserts to put into your shoes. Your feet will thank you.
  5. For extreme cases, make an appointment with a podiatrist. If these DIY remedies don’t work for you, this is your best option. This way, your podiatrist can determine what the proper action is for you to take.

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