Circulator Boot Therapy is a revolutionary treatment option for both diabetics and non-diabetics that can prevent amputations of the lower extremities, even in advanced cases where surgery has already been scheduled.

Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.
Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.

As well as providing an immediate boost to arterial and venous circulation, the procedure can also slowly break down clots. It increases the breakdown of plaque within the arteries by the release of nitric oxide oxygen and nourishment increase. You will see swelling and pain subside with the first few sessions. As circulation is restored with each further session, the body can begin to heal itself.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has used Circulator Boot Therapy to save a staggering 38 limbs from being amputated.

“It saves people’s lives,” said Dr. Goldbaum, who is the only doctor in South Florida with access to a Circular Boot. “When you have an amputation, within five years there is usually another event that transpires and people can pass away because of it.”

Circulation Boot Therapy is an excellent method for treating and correcting circulation problems such as diabetic ulcers and venous insufficiency.

“This is one of the few things we have that’s external and it does a terrific job,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This actually saves people’s limbs from being taken off.”

Many amputations begin with a small injury to the foot, leg or toe, especially in the case of diabetics. Proper treatment, such as Circulator Boot Therapy, can prevent what may ultimately lead to infections and gangrene and end with an amputation and often a myriad of life long medical complications.

“Every time I have used Circulator Boot Therapy, it has increased blood flow,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “It’s all about blood flow. If you have good blood flow, then you have oxygen and nutrients that the body needs to heal.”

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Your feet and ankles are further from the heart than any other points on your body, so it’s important to know how to improve circulation in your legs.

(Jirka Lejska / Wikimedia Commons)
(Jirka Lejska / Wikimedia Commons)

For this reason, it is especially important that blood is able return from your lower extremities up to the heart without any difficulty. When you recognize that your circulatory system isn’t working properly, it’s likely time to make some changes to your lifestyle and contact your physician in order to work out a plan to get your blood properly flowing throughout your body again.

If you are diabetic, this issue becomes even more serious as poor circulation can often lead to a myriad of problems, including the formation of ulcers and potential amputation.

Luckily, there are several simple steps that can be taken to improve your circulation, such has:

How to Improve Circulation in Your Legs

1) Exercise Regularly

The transition from inactive to active can often be overwhelming for those looking to improve their health. The task doesn’t have to be daunting, however, if it is approached with the intent of gradually improving your levels of intensity and exercise duration rather than attempting to become a tri-athlete overnight. A good place to start is with some simple walking and then work your way up from there. If you begin to feel pain, take breaks as needed, but the goal should be to walk for 20-30 minutes a day, three to five days a week. From there, the sky’s the limit!

2) Maintain a Proper Diet

You are what you eat, and dietary choices often have a direct affect on your physical conditioning. Choosing to consume meals that are based on low-fat, minimally-processed foods are a great way to promote healthy blood flow and improve your overall physical health. Specific foods to include in your heart-healthy diet include oranges, sunflower seeds, salmon, avocados, watermelon, garlic and ginger.

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Believe it or not, there’s a lot more to good diabetic care than healthy eating and maintaining stable blood sugar levels.

Regular foot checks are an increasingly essential part of diabetes management as nerve damage and reduced circulation caused by diabetes can lead to reduced awareness of pain (neuropathy) and slower healing of the foot, which increases the risk of infection and foot ulcers.

Foot problems are one of the most common complications associated with diabetes and it’s important to check your feet daily for signs of damage in order to avoid future problems. In severe cases, poor foot care may lead to amputation of a foot or leg. In fact, even something as minimal as a blister or a sore could lead to an infection or a non-healing wound.

“Patients with diabetes have a decrease in sensation to their lower extremities,” said Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience. “Because of this, they can’t feel things that a person would normally feel.”

While there are many preventative measures that diabetics can be taken reduce the risk of a foot infection, Dr. Golbaum insists that his patients not only check their feet twice a day — once in the morning and again at night — but also moisturize their feet daily to combat dryness.

“Diabetics have a dryness, which can cause cracking on their feet,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This cracking makes them more vulnerable to infections that can enter through those openings and cause problems.

“The moisturizing and massaging process increases circulation through movement and also supplies moisture that diabetes takes away from the skin. It really acts as a protective barrier for your skin.”

When examining your feet at home, look out for any general signs of damage that include:

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(Get your feet checked at Delray Beach Podiatry & Boynton Beach Podiatry)
(Get your feet checked at Delray Beach Podiatry & Boynton Beach Podiatry)

National Diabetes Month is observed every November to draw attention to diabetes and its effects on millions of Americans.

National Diabetes Month was initially established 40 years ago in 1975, though Congress and the U.S. presidents didn’t start passing proclamations recognizing November as “diabetes month” until the mid-80s.

The American Diabetes Association trademarked “American Diabetes Month” in 1997.

Diabetes is a disease that leads to high levels of blood sugar (glucose). It happens when the body does not make any or enough insulin, or does not use insulin well. Diabetes can lead to serious health problems, but people with diabetes can take steps to manage the disease and lower the chance of health problems.

There are nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States living with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association.

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If you are currently living with diabetes, it’s important that you know the dangers of neuropathy.

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet.

(Base Image: MorgueFile.com)
(Base Image: MorgueFile.com)

This condition can manifest in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly.

It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

There are four main types of neuropathy seen in people with diabetes. The most common form is peripheral neuropathy, or damage to the nerves that reach out from the brain and spine to all the parts of the body.

The symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart.

Other potential complications of diabetic neuropathy include:

The Dangers of Diabetic Neuropathy

Amputation: People with peripheral neuropathy of the lower body may not feel an injury to one of their feet, or may not feel a sore, which can become severely infected. The risk of infection is high because diabetes reduces blood flow to your feet. Infections that spread to the bone and cause tissue death (gangrene) may be impossible to treat and require amputation.

Urinary problems: Damage to the nerves that control your bladder can prevent it from emptying completely. This allows bacteria to multiply in your bladder and kidneys, leading to urinary tract infections.

Low blood pressure: Damage to the nerves that control circulation can affect your body’s ability to adjust blood pressure. This can cause a sharp drop in pressure when you stand after sitting and can result in dizziness and fainting.

Digestive problems: Nerve damage in the digestive system can cause a wide variety of problems, including constipation, diarrhea and nausea. It can also cause gastroparesis, a condition in which the stomach empties too slowly or not at all.

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