Running is a good and popular method of exercise that helps the runner lose weight and have better cardiovascular health. Running can also be very relaxing to some people since it can be therapeutic, and the additional health benefits make people choose running over many other types of exercise. Running also transports you from place to place, and it can be done with minimal equipment and whatever amount of time you have available. Running on different surfaces, such as pavement, sand and grass, all have a different impact to your feet.

Running on Different Surfaces

Running on Pavement

Running on pavement puts added stress on the foot and leg. (MorgueFiles.com)
Running on pavement puts added stress on the foot and leg. (MorgueFiles.com)

Running on pavement means you can run faster, because the surface is smooth and even. However, the consequence is that the surface is harder and has a bigger impact on the body due to the fact each stride can hit the same spot and cause the same impact stresses on the foot and leg. For those who already have issues with your feet, this may not be something you want to hear and maybe it’s time to change your scenery.

Beach Running

Running on the beach and sand is less stressful to the legs and hips because the impact of each stride is absorbed by the sand. It also requires more muscles to engage because of the lesser rebound effect, compared to pavement. The hip flexors, quads and glutes are all involved more when participating in beach running. For some, the intention of more muscle involvement makes beach running more attractive than other surfaces. For those with foot issues, this is a better alternative than pavement for your runs (and you can’t beat the views!).

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An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of peripheral neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Peripheral neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

In the world of podiatry, most cases of peripheral neuropathy are found in the feet and develop from nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy can occur in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly. It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

The condition can also manifest itself in the feet as a side effect from certain medications, neurological disorders, arthritis or as a result from a traumatic injury. As of today, more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified, each with its own symptoms and prognosis, and are classified according to the type of damage to the nerves have sustained.

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An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

As Neuropathy Treatment Centers, Delray Beach & Boynton Beach Podiatry provide patients access to advanced neuropathy treatments through the use of state-of-the-art technology and personal one-on-one care, provided by Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum and Dr. Larry J. Kipp.

Dr. Larry J. Kipp (left) and Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum treating a patient at the Neuropathy Treatment Center.
Dr. Larry J. Kipp (left) and Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum treating a patient at the Neuropathy Treatment Center.

“We can offer treatments for the lower extremities that most doctors do not have,” said Dr. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience. “We offer the newest technological advances for the treatment of neuropathy.”

In the world of podiatry, most cases of peripheral neuropathy are found in the feet and develop from nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy can occur in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly.

It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

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A bunion is a bony bump that forms on the joint at the base of your big toe. Bunion pain occurs when your big toe pushes against your next toe, forcing the joint of your big toe to get bigger and stick out.

5 Tips to Ease Bunion Pain (Wikimedia Commons)
5 Tips to Ease Bunion Pain (Wikimedia Commons)

The underlying cause of bunions is a deformity of the joint at the base of the big toe known as the hallux valgus. In this deformity, the joint develops a prominent sideways angle, which pushes the bones of the big towards the smaller toes.

Smaller bunions, known as bunionettes, can also develop on the joint of your little toes.

Although bunions can be easy to visibly diagnos thanks to the progressively unusual shape of the toe, further investigation is often advisable. Your doctor will usually send you for X-rays to determine the extent of the deformity.

While it is believed that bunions can be hereditary, other factors, such as having flat fleet or wearing shoes with elevated heels and a narrow toe-box, may also contribute to bunion development.

As a bunion develops, swelling, redness and pain is typically felt at the base of the big toe and in the ball of the foot. Eventually, the area becomes shiny and warm to the touch.

All bunions are permanent unless surgically corrected, but there are some measures you can take to be more comfortable or to slow a bunion’s progression. As with any foot pain, it is best to seek medical care. In addition, here are some tips that can help reduce bunion pain:

5 Tips to Ease Bunion Pain

Wear roomier shoes: Wearing good footwear does not cure the deformity but may ease symptoms of pain and discomfort. Make sure that your shoes are the right size for you as wearing shoes that are too small can make bunions a lot worse. High heels can also add additional pain and prevent the bunion from healing. Over-the-counter arch supports can also provide relief for some people, although others may want to consider visiting a podiatrist for a custom orthotic device to achieve maximum comfort and effectiveness.

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Athlete’s foot, also known as tinea pedis, is a common fungal infection that affects the sole of the foot and usually begins between the toes.

There are a variety of fungi that cause athlete’s foot, and these can be contracted in many locations, including gyms, locker rooms, swimming pools, nail salons, and from contaminated socks and clothing. In many cases, the fungus that causes athlete’s foot is contracted from walking barefoot in areas where someone else with athlete’s foot has walked.

Want to know more about Athlete's foot treatment can help you? Read more to find out!
Want to know more about Athlete’s foot treatment can help you? Read more to find out!

If you have a rash on your foot that doesn’t improve within a few weeks after self-treatment, consult your healthcare provider. If you have diabetes, it is best to seek help sooner rather than later to avoid further complications.

Causes

Athlete’s foot is similar to other fungal infections, such as ringworm and jock itch, and can be spread by contact with an infected person or from contact with contaminated surfaces, such as towels, floors and shoes.

Although athlete’s foot is contagious, some people are more likely to get it than others. The chance of contracting athlete’s foot also increases with age. Additionally, if you’ve already had athlete’s foot once, you are at an increased risk to get it again.

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