An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of peripheral neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Peripheral neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

In the world of podiatry, most cases of peripheral neuropathy are found in the feet and develop from nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy can occur in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly. It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

The condition can also manifest itself in the feet as a side effect from certain medications, neurological disorders, arthritis or as a result from a traumatic injury. As of today, more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified, each with its own symptoms and prognosis, and are classified according to the type of damage to the nerves have sustained.

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Believe it or not, there’s a lot more to good diabetic care than healthy eating and maintaining stable blood sugar levels.

Regular foot checks are an increasingly essential part of diabetes management as nerve damage and reduced circulation caused by diabetes can lead to reduced awareness of pain (neuropathy) and slower healing of the foot, which increases the risk of infection and foot ulcers.

Foot problems are one of the most common complications associated with diabetes and it’s important to check your feet daily for signs of damage in order to avoid future problems. In severe cases, poor foot care may lead to amputation of a foot or leg. In fact, even something as minimal as a blister or a sore could lead to an infection or a non-healing wound.

“Patients with diabetes have a decrease in sensation to their lower extremities,” said Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience. “Because of this, they can’t feel things that a person would normally feel.”

While there are many preventative measures that diabetics can be taken reduce the risk of a foot infection, Dr. Golbaum insists that his patients not only check their feet twice a day — once in the morning and again at night — but also moisturize their feet daily to combat dryness.

“Diabetics have a dryness, which can cause cracking on their feet,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This cracking makes them more vulnerable to infections that can enter through those openings and cause problems.

“The moisturizing and massaging process increases circulation through movement and also supplies moisture that diabetes takes away from the skin. It really acts as a protective barrier for your skin.”

When examining your feet at home, look out for any general signs of damage that include:

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For cancer patients, chemotherapy and other drugs used to treat cancer can damage peripheral nerves, which causes neuropathy. When this happens it is called chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN).

www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com
www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com

An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

At Delray Beach and Boynton Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum serves as head of a state-of-the-art a recently unveiled Neuropathy Treatment Center, utilizing effective treatments and advanced technology to treat patients suffering from this unfortunate condition.

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An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

As Neuropathy Centers, Delray Beach Podiatry and Boynton Beach Podiatry are equipped to treat a wide variety of neuropathy-related conditions, including chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), diabetic neuropathy and alcoholic neuropathy.

(www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com)
(www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com)

“We can offer treatments for the lower extremities that most doctors do not have,” said Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience. “We offer the newest technological advances for the treatment of neuropathy.”

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In an effort to greatly improve the lives of neuropathy sufferers in South Florida, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum is proud to announce that Delray Beach Podiatry and Boynton Beach Podiatry will now also serve as Neuropathy Centers for Lower Extremities.

“We can offer treatments for the lower extremities that most doctors do not have,” said Dr. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience. “We offer the newest technological advances for the treatment of neuropathy.”

Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.
Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.

An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

In the world of podiatry, most cases of peripheral neuropathy are found in the feet and develop from nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy can occur in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly.

It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

Continue reading