If you spend your days working on hard surfaces or wear shoes that irritate sensitive tissues, you may develop heel pain, the most common problem affecting the foot and ankle.

Your heel can hurt for any number of reasons, the most common being an inflammation or tearing of the plantar fascia, a band of fibrous connective tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot from the heel bone across the arch to the toes. This condition is known as plantar fasciitis and can cause pain that radiates from the heel to other parts of the foot.

If you are suffering from chronic heel pain, it is imperative that you consult your primary care doctor or orthopaedic foot and ankle specialist right away to determine the severity of the issue and to develop a treatment plan. In most cases, a doctor will examine the heel, looking and feeling for signs of tenderness and swelling.

Five common treatment tips for heel pain include:

RICE: You’ve probably heard of this one before. It’s one of the most common ways to treat heel pain and can be broken down into these relatively simple steps: rest, ice, compress and elevate. Resting the injury limits the amount of stress the area absorbs while the other aspects all contribute to the reduction of of bruising and swelling. This method is usually affected for treating most minor heel ailments.

Stretching: It is important to remember to stretch your calf muscles multiple times throughout the day. A standing calf stretch is often recommended by physicians for this purpose. In order to complete this stretch, stand in front of a wall as if you’re going to do a push up. Then, making sure your arm’s length from the wall, place both hands on the wall shoulder-width apart. Finally, lean into the wall with your hip and hold the stretch for 30 seconds. This should be done as much as twice a day for five minutes.

Shoes: Look for shoes with good arch support, particularly if the heel pain is a result of plantar fasciitis or overpronation. If you frequently feel pain while wearing a particular pair of shoes, stop wearing them. It is also important that you always wear shoes and avoid going barefoot.

Orthotics: One of the best preventative measures for ongoing foot problems, a custom-made orthotic provides support and protection to relieve pain and swelling. There are a variety of different inserts that can be used including heel pads or cups, full-length inserts or arch supports.

Time: Patience is a virtue and, in the case of heel pain, can often get you back on your feet faster. It is important to be patient when dealing with heel injuries as the healing process can sometimes be lengthy. You must refrain from stressing the injury through activity and let the healing process run its course.

If your heel pain does not resolve using at-home treatments in two weeks, visit your podiatrist as additional treatments may be needed such as anti-inflammatory medications, night splints, steroid injections, pre-fabricated or custom-made orthotics, castboots, shockwave therapy or surgery.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian Goldbaum, a podiatrist with over 30 years of experiences, can provide a seven point assessment report to determine if you need any biochemical corrections with your feet.

Referred to as digital orthotics, Cutting 3DO Technology assesses your weight distribution, areas of high pressure, body balance and mass displacement.

Cutting 3DO Technology also analyzes gait symmetry, body symmetry and your phases of gait.

For a consultation with Dr. Goldbaum, click here more information.

Follow Delray Beach Podiatry on Twitter @Delray_Podiatry

The content on this website is for informational purposes only. Do not rely or act upon information from www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com without seeking professional medical advice. If you live in South Florida and would like a consultation with Dr. Ian Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, please see our contact information below:

BOCA/DELRAY

16244 S. Military Trail #290, Delray Beach, FL 33445

561-499-0033

BOYNTON BEACH

8198 Jog Road #100, Boynton Beach, FL 33472

561-499-0033

Although the majority of golf injuries are associated with the back, hips, and knees, it’s important to remember that your feet and ankles are also vulnerable on the links. The average golfer walks four-to-five miles over the course of three-to-five hours during an 18-hole round, putting an excessive amount of strain on their lower extremities throughout the afternoon.

In most cases, injuries that occur in the foot and ankle during golf activities are either due to overuse type injuries or traumatic injuries. An overuse injury is any type of muscle or joint injury, such as tendinitis or a stress fracture, that’s caused by repetitive trauma. In this case, repetitive trauma manifests itself in the form of a golf swing, which can be repeated anywhere from 100-200 times during a single round.

A normal golf swing – sorry Charles Barkley, this article isn’t for you — can be broken down into five main phases: the set-up, takeaway, downswing, impact, and follow-through.

At set up, a golfer stands with equal weight on both feet, with some weight perhaps slightly more to the insides of the feet, in preparation of the swing. During the takeaway, more commonly known as the back swing, the front foot rotates outward (pronates) while the back foot remains stable as it receives more weight. At the end of this step, the front heel may even rise off the ground to promote a full shoulder turn.

For the downswing, weight is rapidly shifted to the front foot until impact, at which point the weight should then be evenly distributed between both feet. A lateral shift of the hips and knees will occur during downswing that continues through the impact of the ball as the front foot rotates inward (supinate) and the back heel comes off the ground with increased weight on the big toe.

The latter phases of the swing are when the body is most susceptible to developing injuries as the motions become more violent and weight is shifted.

Here are several common foot and ankle injuries that affect golfers:

Heel Pain: This condition is also known as plantar fasciitis and commonly occurs due to excessive pronation in the feet. The pain will be located in the center of the heel and can be exacerbated by excessive walking on the golf course.

Metatarsalgia: This term refers to any pain in the fore foot region. This can be caused due or corns, hard skin or bony pain.

Neuromas: This condition is a common injury among golfers defined by swelling and scarring around one of the nerves that run in the in-between spaces in the ball of the foot just before the toes separate. It can produce sharp, stabbing pain and typically occurs in the non-dominant foot.

Subungal Hematomas: This occurs when a golfer applies excessive pressure to the big toe during their swing. It occurs only in the dominant foot and, after excessive repetition, the subungal tissue will be injured and blood will form under the nail plate. It can be prevented by slightly rotating the back foot away from the ball before the swing, which will take pressure off of the big toe.

Tendonitis: Think using a golf cart will protect you from injury? Think again. The constant strain of applying the breaks and getting out of the vehicle actually puts a strain on the muscles on top of the foot that can result in tendinitis.

To help keep you on the course, studies have found that custom orthotics, which a podiatrist can craft specifically for your feet, not only reduce the risk of off injury,  but also increase balance and allow golfers to drive the ball farther.

“All timing, distance, and direction comes out of the lower body with the feet leading the way,” legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus once said.

Who are we to question The Golden Bear?

Follow Delray Beach Podiatry on Twitter @Delray_Podiatry

The content on this website is for informational purposes only. Do not rely or act upon information from www.DelrayBeachPodiatry.com without seeking professional medical advice. If you live in South Florida and would like a consultation with Dr. Ian Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, please see our contact information below:

BOCA/DELRAY

16244 S. Military Trail #290, Delray Beach, FL 33445

561-499-0033

BOYNTON BEACH

8198 Jog Road #100, Boynton Beach, FL 33472

561-499-0033


The Miami Dolphins have taken rookie wide receiver and first-round pick DeVante Parker (foot) off the physically unable to perform list, the team announced Wednesday.

It remains likely that Parker will miss the remainder of the preseason, but the team is hopeful that he will be available for their Week 1 regular-season opener against the Washington Redskin on Sept. 13. Parker, the first receiver to be selected by the Dolphins in the first round since Ted Ginn Jr. in 2007, underwent foot surgery in June after a screw that had been previously inserted into his left foot needed to be replaced for precautionary reasons.

Parker, 22, caught 43 passes for 855 yards and five touchdowns in the six games during an injury-plagued season at Louisville last season. He is expected to play a major role in Miami’s revamped receiving core that includes fellow newcomers Kenny Stills, Greg Jennings and Jordan Cameron.

As Dr. Goldbaum mentioned in our previous story on Parker’s recovery, it is important for the dynamic wideout to take a measured approach to his recovery in order to decrease the risk of re-injury.

No longer on the PUP list, Parker is now allowed to participate in practices on a limited basis.

In addition to Parker, Miami also announced that backup defensive back Don Jones (shoulder) will come off the PUP list.

The Dolphins will hold joint practices with the Carolina Panthers on Wednesday and Thursday before facing the Panthers in their second preseason game on Saturday.

Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum is a Podiatric Physician and Surgeon serving patients in Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Boynton Beach.

Follow Delray Beach Podiatry on Twitter @Delray_Podiatry

Call or email today for immediate 
answers to your questions.

BOCA/DELRAY

16244 S. Military Trail #290, Delray Beach, FL 33445

561-499-0033

BOYNTON BEACH

8198 Jog Road #100, Boynton Beach, FL 33472

561-499-0033

As the Miami Dolphins prepare for their preseason opener against the Chicago Bears at Soldier Field on Thursday night, the organization’s first-round pick, DeVante Parker, remains out of action after undergoing foot surgery earlier in the offseason.

Parker, the first wide receiver the Dolphins selected in the first round since Ted Ginn Jr. in 2007, is expected to miss most, if not all, of the team’s four-game preseason after a screw that had been previously inserted into his left foot was replaced for precautionary reasons.

The surgery, which was conducted at Doctors Hospital at Baptist Health South Florida on June 5, stems from an injury that took place during Parker’s senior season at Louisville where the 22-year-old wideout was sidelined for seven games after breaking the fifth metatarsal in his left foot.

In the world of podiatry, a fifth metatarsal base fracture is seen as a fairly common orthopedic injury that occurs when twisting of the ankle and foot causes a small piece of bone to be pulled off the main portion of the bone by a tendon or ligament. In order to repair the damage, a screw is inserted into the foot to restore the bone and tendon to their natural position.

An X-Ray of a patient who has had a screw inserted into their foot. (Credit: Delray Beach Podiatry)
An X-Ray of a patient who has had a screw inserted into their foot. (Credit: Delray Beach Podiatry)

Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a board certified podiatrist with over 30 years of experience, has performed similar surgeries at his offices in Delray Beach and Boynton Beach and notes that an early return to the field might have played a role in Parker needing to go back under the knife.

“High-demand people, they get on it too fast,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “He was probably just on it a bit too much.”

In an interview with the Sun Sentinel, Parker did note that he was feeling some initial discomfort upon his return from the initial surgery.

“When I first came back it bothered me a little bit,” Parker said, “but as I went on later in the season my foot felt 100 percent, so there were no problems with that.”

Parker, who has been at the Dolphins’ facility every day during training camp, still cannot run full speed, but according to ESPN, has had no trouble walking and hasn’t been seen wearing a boot.

“It’s hard to say; we’re not sure exactly when he’s going to get back,” Dolphins coach Joe Philbin said Tuesday. “I don’t know if he’s going to practice? How much he’s going to practice? If he’s going to play in the preseason? Those are all hypotheticals.”

At 6-foot-3 and 218 pounds, Parker’s unique blend of size and skill is expected to add a new dynamic to Miami’s revamped receiving core that includes fellow newcomers Kenny Stills and Greg Jennings.

According to Dr. Goldbaum, however, Parker’s large frame, coupled with the physical demands of his profession, also puts him at risk for continued foot and ankle problems.

“In sports, especially in an NFL patient, you’ve got a heavy guy going against another heavy guy,” said Dr. Goldbaum, who noted the constant stress that football puts on the peroneus brevis muscle of the foot. “Patients who are high demand have a greater chance of re-injuring due to the risk presented by their continued activity in the sport.”

That being said, if Parker takes care of himself, Dr. Goldbaum sees no reason why he shouldn’t be able to remain healthy throughout his career.

“If he trains right and everything goes well, he should be fine,” he said.

Follow Delray Beach Podiatry on Twitter @Delray_Podiatry

Call or email today for immediate 
answers to your questions.

BOCA/DELRAY

16244 S. Military Trail #290, Delray Beach, FL 33445

561-499-0033

BOYNTON BEACH

8198 Jog Road #100, Boynton Beach, FL 33472

561-499-0033