Running is a good and popular method of exercise that helps the runner lose weight and have better cardiovascular health. Running can also be very relaxing to some people since it can be therapeutic, and the additional health benefits make people choose running over many other types of exercise. Running also transports you from place to place, and it can be done with minimal equipment and whatever amount of time you have available. Running on different surfaces, such as pavement, sand and grass, all have a different impact to your feet.

Running on Different Surfaces

Running on Pavement

Running on pavement puts added stress on the foot and leg. (MorgueFiles.com)
Running on pavement puts added stress on the foot and leg. (MorgueFiles.com)

Running on pavement means you can run faster, because the surface is smooth and even. However, the consequence is that the surface is harder and has a bigger impact on the body due to the fact each stride can hit the same spot and cause the same impact stresses on the foot and leg. For those who already have issues with your feet, this may not be something you want to hear and maybe it’s time to change your scenery.

Beach Running

Running on the beach and sand is less stressful to the legs and hips because the impact of each stride is absorbed by the sand. It also requires more muscles to engage because of the lesser rebound effect, compared to pavement. The hip flexors, quads and glutes are all involved more when participating in beach running. For some, the intention of more muscle involvement makes beach running more attractive than other surfaces. For those with foot issues, this is a better alternative than pavement for your runs (and you can’t beat the views!).

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About 20 percent of the population suffers from brittle nail syndrome, a condition that causes toenails to become extremely brittle and ultimately break.

Your toenails are made up of layers of protein that are responsible for making the nail strong and thick. In people suffering from brittle nail syndrome, these protein layers separate or break down.

Get help for brittle toenails at Delray Beach Podiatry. [Image via MorgueFile.com]
Get help for brittle toenails at Delray Beach Podiatry. [Image via MorgueFile.com]
It’s important to remember that like our skin, nails can also dry out, which causes them to break and become more vulnerable to toenail infections. This condition most often occurs with repeated exposure to moisture and can be exacerbated by low atmospheric humidity. This is because your nails expand when they come into contact with water, and then contract when they dry out. Unfortunately, this constant back and forth between expansion and contract eventually takes a toll on your nails and makes them brittle.

Medically known as onychorrhexis, brittle toenails are visually unappealing as it causes the nails become rigid and split.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Nails that break or peel easily
  • Flaking at the base of the nail
  • Your nails have a series of longitudinal ridges
  • The protein layers of your nails break down or separate

There is often not one single cause for brittle toenail syndrome, but rather a number of factors working together.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has found that there are several possible causes of of brittle toenail syndrome that include, but are not limited to the following:

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An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer from some form of peripheral neuropathy, a condition that affects the normal activity of the nerves that connect the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — to the rest of the body.

Peripheral neuropathy can involve various different nerve types, including motor, sensory, and autonomic nerves. It can also be categorized by the size of the nerve fibers involved, large or small.

In the world of podiatry, most cases of peripheral neuropathy are found in the feet and develop from nerve damage caused by diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy can occur in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce the insulin necessary to convert glucose into the energy that the body needs. Type 2 diabetes, which is far more common, occurs when the body is unable to use insulin properly. It has been estimated that between 60 to 70 percent of diabetics will deal with some form of neuropathy in their lifetime, compared to only a 25 to 30 percent chance for non-diabetics.

The condition can also manifest itself in the feet as a side effect from certain medications, neurological disorders, arthritis or as a result from a traumatic injury. As of today, more than 100 types of peripheral neuropathy have been identified, each with its own symptoms and prognosis, and are classified according to the type of damage to the nerves have sustained.

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Circulator Boot Therapy is a revolutionary treatment option for both diabetics and non-diabetics that can prevent amputations of the lower extremities, even in advanced cases where surgery has already been scheduled.

Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.
Circulator Boot Therapy in action at Delray Beach Podiatry.

As well as providing an immediate boost to arterial and venous circulation, the procedure can also slowly break down clots. It increases the breakdown of plaque within the arteries by the release of nitric oxide oxygen and nourishment increase. You will see swelling and pain subside with the first few sessions. As circulation is restored with each further session, the body can begin to heal itself.

At Delray Beach Podiatry, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, has used Circulator Boot Therapy to save a staggering 38 limbs from being amputated.

“It saves people’s lives,” said Dr. Goldbaum, who is the only doctor in South Florida with access to a Circular Boot. “When you have an amputation, within five years there is usually another event that transpires and people can pass away because of it.”

Circulation Boot Therapy is an excellent method for treating and correcting circulation problems such as diabetic ulcers and venous insufficiency.

“This is one of the few things we have that’s external and it does a terrific job,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “This actually saves people’s limbs from being taken off.”

Many amputations begin with a small injury to the foot, leg or toe, especially in the case of diabetics. Proper treatment, such as Circulator Boot Therapy, can prevent what may ultimately lead to infections and gangrene and end with an amputation and often a myriad of life long medical complications.

“Every time I have used Circulator Boot Therapy, it has increased blood flow,” said Dr. Goldbaum. “It’s all about blood flow. If you have good blood flow, then you have oxygen and nutrients that the body needs to heal.”

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In a recent interview with DiabeticCouncil.com, Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum, a podiatric physician and surgeon with over 30 years of experience, was presented with two questions regarding foot care for newly diagnosed diabetics.

The full article, which features responses from 47 podiatrists around the United States, can be found here, but if you are looking for just Dr. Goldbaum’s responses, they can be be found below.

Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.
Dr. Ian S. Goldbaum (pictured) has been practicing medicine for over 30 years, arriving to South Florida in 1985.

Q: What tips would you give to someone who is newly diagnosed?

A: The first thing a patient needs to do is realize that everything is going to change in terms of how they take care of their feet. What used to be labeled as a harmless cut or blister now can become something far worse if left untreated. The first thing a newly diagnosed diabetic needs to learn is to work a foot check — the bottom, the top and even in between toes — into their daily routine. A podiatrist should also be called upon to keep tabs on the health of their feet, especially if there are any signs of infection or abnormalities. Given how diabetes negatively affects circulation, even a small scape on the bottom of the foot has the potential to turn into a serious ulcer, as your body’s ability to get a proper amount of blood flow heading to your lower extremities becomes more and more limited. For this reason, increased attention to the state of your feet is one of the key changes all diabetics need to make in order to remain healthy.

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